Saturday , July 31 2021
9th Class CBSE English Literature Reader

Lord Ullin’s Daughter: 9th Class English Literature Reader 09

Lord Ullin’s Daughter: NCERT 9th Class CBSE English Course Communicative: Literature Reader Interact in English Chapter 09

Question: Scotland stretches away in a spectacular fusion of wooded glens, sweeping moors, rugged coasts, towering mountains, green valleys and deep blue lakes known as Lochs. The Scottish people have long been famous for their close-knit clans organised under chieftains who often led fierce warriors to savage feuds.

Lord Ullin’s Daughter – Answer: Only for self-attempt.

Question: Lord Ullin’s Daughter is one of the most popular romantic poems of Thomas Campbell. It describes how a Scottish Chieftain and his beloved flee her wrathful father, but their defiance leads to their deaths, in a surging, stormy sea.

Answer: Only for self-attempt.

Question: Your teacher will play a recording of the poem. Listen to it with your books closed and conjure up a scene of mystery, adventure and high drama that the poem portrays.

Answer: A Classroom Activity.

Question: Now, listen to the poem again. As you listen this time, read the poem aloud, alongwith the recording. Try to copy the rhythm of the recording.

Answer: A Classroom Activity.

Question: On the basis of your understanding of the poem, answer the following questions by ticking the correct choice.

(a) Lord Ullin’s daughter and her lover are trying to _________

  1. escape the wrath of her father.
  2. settle in a distant land.
  3. challenge the storm in the lake.
  4. trying to prove their love for each other.

Answer:

  • (1.) escape the wrath of her father.

(b) The boatman agrees to ferry them across because _________

  1. he has fallen in love with Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  2. he wants to avenge Lord Ullin.
  3. he has lost his love.
  4. he is sorry for the childlike innocence of the lady.

Answer:

  • (4.) he is sorry for the childlike innocence of the lady.

(c) The mood changes in the poem. It transforms from ________

  1. happiness to fear.
  2. anxiety to grief.
  3. fear to happiness.
  4. love to pain.

Answer:

  • (2.) anxiety to grief.

(d) The shore of Lochgyle has been referred to as ‘fatal shore!’ The poetic device used here is _______

  1. metaphor.
  2. simile.
  3. transferred epithet.
  4. onomatopoeia

Answer:

  • (1.) metaphor.

Question: In pairs copy and complete the summary of the poem with suitable words / expressions.

A Scottish Chieftain and his beloved were (a) ______ from her wrathful father. As they reached the shores, the (b) _____ told a boatman to (c) ________ them across Lochgyle. He asked him to do it quickly because if (d) _______ found them, they would kill him. The boatman (e) _______ to take them not for the (f) ______ that the Chieftain offered but for his (g) ______. By this time, the storm had (h) ______ and a wild wind had started blowing. The sound of (i) ______ could be heard close at hand. The lady urged the batman (j) ______ as she did not want to face an angry father. Their boat left the (k) ______ and as it got caught in the stormy sea, Lord Ullin reached the deadly (l) _____ His anger changed to wailing when he saw his daughter (m) _______. He asked her to return to the shore. But it was (n) ______ as the stormy sea claimed his daughter and her lover.

Answer:

(a) fleeing / escaping
(b) Chieftain
(c) row
(d) Lord Ullin’s men
(e) promised
(f) silver pound
(g) winsome bride
(h) grown furious
(i) stamping
(j) to make haste
(k) stormy land
(l) shore
(m) caught in the storm
(n) in vain / too late

Question: Why does Lord Ullin’s daughter defy her father and elope with her lover? (Stanza 1)

Answer: Lord Ullin’s beautiful daughter loves the Scottish chieftain passionately. Her father Lord Ullin is against their relationship and marriage. He is not favorably disposed to the Scottish chieftain. So Ullin’s daughter defies her father and decides to elope with her lover. She does so to escape the wrath of her angry father.

Question: Give two characteristics of the boatman who ferries the couple across the sea.

Answer: The greatest characteristic of the boatman is his sincerity and human sympathy. He decides to row the boat in the stormy and the furious sea not for the bright silver pound that the chieftain promised but for his “winsome bride”. The other characteristic that immediately strikes us is his courage. He is a man of words who doesn’t care for the stormy sea or the scowling sky. He risks his own life to help the lovers in need.

Question: “Imagery” refers to something that can be perceived through more than one of the senses. It uses figurative language to help form mental pictures. Campbell uses vivid, diverse and powerful imagery to personify the menacing face of nature. Pick out expressions that convey the images of anger in the following stanzas:

Answer:

Question: Read the following lines and answer the questions that follow:

“His horsemen hard behind us ride; Should they our steps discover,
Then who will cheer my bonny bride When they have slain her lover?”

  1. Who is ‘his’ in line 1? Who does ‘us’ refer to?
  2. Explain: ‘cheer my bonny bride’.
  3. Why would the lover be slain?

Answer:

  1. ‘His’ stands for Lord Ullin. ‘Us’ refers to Lord Ullin’s daughter and her lover.
  2. It means that if the Scottish chieftain is killed, there will be no one to look after and make his beautiful bride happy.
  3. If the lover is caught, it is sure that he will be killed by Lord Ullin and his armed men. Lord Ullin doesn’t want his daughter to marry her lover.

Question: “The water-wraith was shrieking”. Is the symbolism in this line a premonition of what happens at the end ? Give reasons for your answer. (Stanza 7)

Answer: Certainly the symbolism in this line is a premonition of what is about to happen at the end. The stormy sea is getting furious and the rising waves have assumed the shape of ghosts threatening to swallow the lovers in the tempest. Certainly, Lord Ullin’s beautiful daughter and her lover are going to meet their watery graves in the sea at the end.

Question: The poet uses words like ‘adown’, ‘rode’ which contain harsh consonants. Why do you think the poet has done this? (Stanza 8)

Answer: The poet uses such hard consonants like ‘adown’ ‘rode’, etc. to heighten the effect of the great anger of Lord Ullin and his men, who are hotly chasing the two lovers. Similarly other hard consonants express the anger of the sea, sky and waves, ‘storm grew loud’, ‘scowl of heaven’ and ‘water wraith’, etc.

Question:

In Stanza 10, the poet says —
The boat has left a stormy land,
A stormy sea before her,

  1. In both these lines, the word “stormy” assumes different connotations. What are they?
  2. The lady faces a dilemma herS. What is it? What choice does she finally make?

Answer:

  1. In both these lines the word “stormy” assumes different connotations. ‘The stormy land’ here means the land where the passionate storm of Ullin’s daughter and her lover had ravaged the family. The boat left the stormy land where Lord Ullin and his stormy armed horsemen were giving the lovers a hot chase. ‘The stormy sea’ here means the furious stormy sea that faced their boat.
  2. Lord Ullin’s beautiful daughter somehow has to face a rough weather everywhere. If she goes back home, she will be confronted with the fury of a stormy father. So she decides to face the stormy sea and the scowling sky as she can’t face the anger of her father.

Question:

  1. “Lord Ullin reached that fatal shore” just as his daughter left it. (Stanza 11). Why is the shore called fatal?
  2. Why does Lord Ullin’s wrath change into wailing on seeing his daughter?

Answer:

  1. It was too late for Lord Ullin. When he reached the shore, he saw with his own eyes his beautiful daughter lying dead on it. Hence, the shore has become ‘fatal’.
  2. Lord Ullin gave a hot chase with his armed men to arrest and kill the lover of his daughter. But when he saw the dead body of his daughter lying on the shore, his anger changed into wailing and mourning.

Question: “One lovely hand she stretch’d for aid.” Do you think Lord Ullin’s daughter wanted to reach out to her father? (Stanza 12) If yes, why?

Answer: It is only a speculation. Perhaps she heard her father giving assurance of forgiving them. That would have prompted the daughter stretching her hand for aid in those circumstances. Otherwise, she would have preferred facing the stormy sea and scowling sky to an angry father.

Question: You are already familiar with the poetic device “alliteration”. The poet makes extensive use of the same throughout the poem. Pick out as many examples of alliteration as you can.

Example: fast – father’s; horsemen – hard.

Answer:

stormy – sea
bonny- bride
human- hand
loud – lashed
storm – shade
water – wild went
did – discover
left – lamenting
fast – father’s

Question: What is the rhyme scheme of the poem?

Answer: The rhyme scheme of the poem is ab, ab. In the last stanza, it is: ab, cb

Question: Imagine you are one of the chiefs of the cavalry riding behind Lord Ullin. You and your men ride for three days at the end of which you reach the shore. Narrate your experience as you witnessed a father lamenting the loss of his child, in the form of a diary entry.

Answer:

20th March 20XX

10 pm.

Lord Ullin’s anger knew no bounds. He couldn’t reconcile his daughter’s elopement with the chieftain of Ulva island. He wanted to catch them and put her lover to death. We were behind him. After three days of hard riding we reached the spot. We could see a boat caught among the stormy sea and the scowling sky. There we saw Lord Ullin wailing bitterly. He was crying most pathetically urging them to come back. He even gave an assurance Jo forgive them. But it was too late and therefore, in vain. The violent and the stormy sea engulfed the boat with its occupants. Lord Ullin was crying to see his beautiful daughter lying dead on the shore. One hand was extended for help and other hand was around her lover. Never had I seen such a heart-rending and tragic sight in my life before.

Question: Imagine that you are Lord Ullin. You bemoan and lament the tragic loss of your lovely daughter and curse yourself for having opposed her alliance with the chieftain. Express your feelings of pain and anguish in a letter to your friend.

Answer:

201, Market Street
Aberdeen, Scotland
20th March, 20XX

Dear James!

They say what can’t be cured must be endured. But I had no patience and endurance. My beautiful daughter. Oh ! How much I loved her. She fell in love with the chieftain of Ulva island. The alliance was definitely not of my liking. The chieftain was no match to the honour and glory of our clan. Hence, I opposed her alliance with him. But the girl was passionately in love and eloped with him to escape my wrath. For three days they kept on running from one place to the other. I took my armed horsemen and gave them a hot chase. I had decided to kill the chieftain if he was caught alive. I came to know that he had taken a boat to reach over the ferry. My daughter was urging the boatman to row fast as she didn’t want to face my anger. At last, they were in our view. Soon the stormy waves engulfed the boat. I saw my daughter struggling and extending a hand for help. My anger turned into wailing. I assured to forgive them. But I was destined to see the most tragic sight in my life. My daughter lay dead with her one arm around her lover.

Yours sincerely

Ullin

Question: In pairs, argue in favor of or against the topic “Lord Ullin’s daughter was right in her decision to defy her father.” Give logical and relevant reasons, and present your point of view to the class.

Answer:

For Classroom Activity.

Paraphrase & Reference To Context

Read the given extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Question: A Chieftain, to the highlands bound,
Cries, “Boatman, do not tarry!
And I’ll give thee a silver pound
To row us o’er the ferry!”

(Lines 1 – 4)

अनुवाद : स्कॉटलैण्ड के पहाड़ों (Highland) की ओर अग्रसर होते हुए कबीले का एक सरदार चिल्लाता है नाविक देर मत कर। मैं तुम्हें (नौका-घाट) पार उतारने के लिये चाँदी का एक पौंड दूंगा।

Paraphrase: A chieftain bound to the Scottish highland cries, “Boatman, don’t delay!” He promised him a silver pound for rowing them over the ferry.

  1. Where was the chieftain bound to?
  2. What did he cry to the boatman?
  3. What did he promise to the boatman?

Answer:

  1. The chieftain was bound to the Scottish highland.
  2. He cried the boatman to row them over the ferry without any further delay.
  3. He promised a silver pound to the boatman for his service.

Question: “Now, who be ye, would cross Lochgyle,
This dark and stormy weather?”
“O, I’m the chief of Ulva’s isle,
And this, Lord Ullin’s daughter.”

(Lines 5 – 8)

अनुवाद: “अब आप कौन हो, जो इस अन्धेरे और तूफानी मौसम में स्वबीहलसम को पार करोगे?” “ओह! मैं Ulva zrq Gr E, Lord Ullin opt ateig

Paraphrase: The boatman asks about the person who is bent on crossing Lochgyle in such a dark and stormy weather. The man replies that he is the chief of Ulva island and this lady is Lord Ullin’s daughter.

  1. Why was the boatman surprised?
  2. How did the chief introduce himself?
  3. Who was the lady with the chief?

Answer:

  1. The boatman was surprised as the chieftain wanted to cross Lochgyle in such a dark and stormy weather.
  2. The chieftain introduced himself as the chief of Ulva’s island.
  3. The lady was Lord Ullin’s daughter.

Question: “And fast before her father’s men
Three days we’ve fled together,
For should he find us in the glen,
My blood would stain the heather.

(Lines 9 – 12)

अनुवाद : और जल्दी करो नहीं तो इसके पिता के आदमी हमें पकड़ लेंगे। तीन दिन से हम इकट्ठे भागे हुए हैं। और यदि इसका पिता हमें इस तंग घाटी में पा लेता है, तो वह मेरे खून से इन (Heather) झाड़ियों को रंग देगा।

Paraphrase: The chieftain asks the boatman to make haste before the father of the girl and his men catch them. They have been fleeing together for three days. If the girl’s father finds in the narrow valley, he will stain the bushes with his blood.

  1. Who was her father?
  2. What did the chieftain want the boatman to do?
  3. What did the chieftain fear?

Answer:

  1. She was the daughter of Lord Ullin.
  2. The chieftain wanted the boatman to make haste and disappear before Lord Ullin and his men appeared on the scene.
  3. The chieftain feared that Lord Ullin and his men would stain the bushes with his blood.

Question: “His horsemen hard behind us ride;
Should they our steps discover,
Then who will cheer my bonny bride
When they have slain her lover?”

(Lines 13—16)

अनुवाद : “उसके घुड़सवार प्रचण्ड रूप से हमारे पीछे लगे हुये हैं। यदि उन्होंने हमारे कदमों को ढूंढ़ लिया और इसके प्रेमी की हत्या कर दी तो मेरी सुन्दर और आकर्षक दुल्हन को कौन खुश रखेगा?”।

Paraphrase: Lord Ullin’s horsemen are closely pursuing them. If they discover their steps, they will kill the lover of this lady. After they kill him there will be no one to cheer his beautiful and fascinating bride.

  1. Whose horsemen are they?
  2. How could they reach the chieftain and his beloved?
  3. What would be the fate of the bonny bride?

Answer:

  1. They are Lord Ullin’s horsemen.
  2. They could reach there by discovering their steps.
  3. There would be no one left to cheer the bony bride after the murder of her lover.

Question: Out spoke the hardy Highland wight,
“I’ll go, my chief—I’m ready:
It is not for your silver bright,
But for your winsome lady:

(Lines 17—20)

अनुवाद : पर्वतीय (Highland) लड़ाकू बोला, “मैं चलूंगा मेरे सरदार, मैं चलने के लिये तैयार हूँ। मैं आपके चमकीले चाँदी के पौण्ड के लिए नहीं, अपितु आपकी सुन्दर पत्नी के लिए, आपको पार उतारूंगा।।

Paraphrase: The brave Highland toughman spoke that he was ready to take his chief over the ferry. He would do so not because he would give him a bright silver pound. He would take them over the ferry only for his beautiful and attractive bride.

  1. Who was the hardy Highland wight?
  2. Who is the winsome lady?
  3. What trait of the boatman’s character is revealed in these lines?

Answer:

  1. The hardy Highland wight being described here was the boatman.
  2. The winsome lady is Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  3. The boatman is a brave and kind-hearted man.

Question: “And by my word! the bonny bird
In danger shall not tarry;
So, though the waves are raging white,
I’ll row you o’er the ferry.”

(Lines 21—24)

अनुवाद : और मेरी कसम है। सुन्दर दुल्हन खतरे में देर तक नहीं रहेगी। हालाँकि तरंगें गुस्से में सफेद (झागदार) हो रही हैं, लेकिन मैं तुम्हें फैरी पार करवाऊँगा।
Paraphrase: The boatman takes an oath that the bride will not live in danger for a long time. Though the waves are turning foamy white with fury, he promises to row them over the ferry.

  1. Who takes an oath?
  2. What did the boatman assure the chief?
  3. How was the weather at that time?

Answer: 

  1. The boatman takes an oath to row them over the ferry.
  2. The boatman assured the chief that the beautiful bride would not remain in danger for a long time.
  3. The weather was very stormy and the sea was furious.

Question: By this the storm grew loud apace,
The water-wraith was shrieking;
And in the scowl of heaven each face
Grew dark as they were speaking.

(Lines 25—28)

अनुवाद: इस समय तक तूफ़ान शोर करता हुआ तेज हो गया था। पानी-रूपी भूत चीख-चिल्ला रहा था। आकाश भी भयंकर रूप धारण कर लिया था।

Paraphrase: By this time the storm grew loud quickly. The water had assumed a ghost-like shape and form and seemed to be shrieking. All the faces who were speaking grew dark in the frowning sky.

  1. How was the sea and the storm?
  2. Why was the water-wraith shrieking?
  3. Who were sitting in the boat?

Answer:

  1. The sea was rough and rising. The storm grew loud quickly.
  2. The water of the sea had assumed a ghost like shape and form and seemed to be shrieking.
  3. The boatman, the Scottish chieftain and his bride, Lord Ullin’s daughter were sitting in the boat.

Question: But still as wilder blew the wind,
And as the night grew drearer,
Adown the glen rode armed men,
Their trampling sounded nearer.

(Lines 29—32)

अनुवाद : फिर जैसे हवा और उग्र होती चली गयी और जैसे रात सुनसान होती चली गयी, तंग घाटी में नीचे उतरते हथियारों से लैस आदमियों के भारी कदमों की आवाज नजदीक आती सुनाई पड़ी।

Paraphrase: The blowing wind grew wilder and the night grew more deserted and fearful. The armed men of Lord Ullin rode down the valley. The stamping of their horses could be heard coming nearer.

  1. How was the weather?
  2. Who were the armed men?
  3. Who were the armed horse-riders chasing?

Answer:

  1. The wind blew wilder and the night grew darker and more fearful.
  2. The armed men chasing the lovers were Lord Ullin’s men.
  3. The armed horse-riders were chasing the Scottish chieftain and his bride, Lord Ullin’s daughter.

Question: “O haste thee, haste!” the lady cries,
“Though tempests round us gather;
I’ll meet the raging of the skies,
But not an angry father.”

(Lines 33—36)

अनुवाद : “ओह, जल्दी करो!” महिला चिल्लाती है। “यद्यपि तूफान हमें चारों ओर से घेर रहे हैं; मैं आक्रोश भरे तूफानी आकाश से मिलने के लिये तैयार हूँ पर एक क्रोधित बाप से नहीं।”

Paraphrase: Lord Ullin’s daughter asks the boatman to make haste. Tempests are gathering all around them. She tells him that she is prepared to face the fury of the stormy sky but not ready to face the fury of an angry father.

  1. Who is the lady?
  2. Who were sitting in the boat?
  3. What and why was the lady ready to face at that time?

Answer:

  1. The lady is Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  2. The boatmen and two young lovers, the Scottish chieftain and his beloved, Lord Ullin’s daughter were sitting in the boat.
  3. The lady was ready to face the stormy sky but was not ready to face the fury of her angry father.

Question: The boat has left a stormy land,
A stormy sea before her,
When, O! too strong for human hand,
The tempest gather’d o’er her.

(Lines 37—40)

अनुवाद : किश्ती ने तुफानी धरती छोड़ दी है और अब एक तूफानी समुद्र उसके सामने है। तब, ओह! तूफान जो इन्सानी हाथों के काबू के बाहर की चीज हो चुका है उसने नाव को चारों ओर से घेर लिया है।

Paraphrase: The boat has left the stormy land. Now a stormy sea is before her. The storm which is too stronger to be controlled by human hands, has gathered over her.

  1. What had the boat left and what was it going to face after it?
  2. Who was the woman and why was she with the Scottish chieftain?
  3. Describe the fury of the storm.

Answer:

  1. The boat had left the stormy land and it was going to face a stormy sea.
  2. The woman was Lord Ullin’s daughter. She had eloped with the Scottish chieftain and married him.
  3. The fury of the storm was too strong to be controlled by human hands.

Question: And still they row’d amidst the roar
Of waters fast prevailing:
Lord Ullin reach’d that fatal shore, –
His wrath was changed to wailing.

(Lines 41—44)

अनुवाद: फिर भी वे पानी की दहाड़ के बीच में नाव को चलाते आगे बढ़े लेकिन पानी तेजी से नाव को अपने कब्जे में ले रहा था। Lord Ulin उस घातक किनारे पर पहुँच गया। उसका क्रोध विलाप में तबदील हो गया।

Paraphrase: And still they rowed in the middle of roaring water that was fast overpowering the boat. Lord Ullin reached the fatal shore. His anger changed into crying and wailing.

  1. Who were ‘they’?
  2. How did they row amid the roar of the stormy sea?
  3. What happened to Lord Ullin’s anger when he reached that “fatal shore”?

Answer:

  1. They were the boatman, Lord Ullin’s daughter and Ulva’s chieftain.
  2. They rowed amid the roar of the stormy sea that was overcoming the boat.
  3. Lord Ullin’s anger changed into crying and wailing when he reached that ‘fatal shore’.

Question: For, sore dismay’d through storm and shade,
His child he did discover,
One lovely hand she stretch’d for aid,
And one was round her lover.

(Lines 45—48)

अनुवाद: उसने तूफान और छाया के सदमे से पीड़ित अपनी बच्ची को ढूंढ लिया। उसका एक सुन्दर हाथ सहायता के लिये फैला हुआ था और दूसरा अपने प्रेमी के चारों ओर लिपटा हुआ था।

Paraphrase: He discovered his child on the shore. Her face looked shocked and in pain due to the storm and the shade. One lovely hand of his daughter was stretched for help and the other was put around her lover.

  1. Who was dismayed through storm and shade?
  2. What did Lord Ullin discover?
  3. Who was Ullin’s daughter’s lover?

Answer:

  1. Lord Ullin’s daughter was dismayed through storm and shade.
  2. Lord Ullin discovered that one hand of his daughter was outstretched for help and the other was round her lover.
  3. Ulva’s chieftain was Lord Ullin’s daughter’s lover.

Question: “Come back! Come back!” he cried in grief
Across this stormy water
And I’ll forgive your highland chief,
My daughter! my daughter!

(Lines 49—52)

अनुवाद : “वापस चली आओ।” इस तूफानी पानी से। वापस चली आओ! वह दुख से चिल्लाया। “ओ मेरी बेटी! ओ मेरी बेटी, मैं तुम्हारे हाईलैण्ड सरदार को माफ कर दूंगा।”

Paraphrase: Lord Ullin cried in grief and asked his daughter to come back across the stormy water. He promised her that he would forgive her lover, the highland chief.

  1. Who cried in grief?
  2. What was the cause of his grief?
  3. What wrong had the highland chieftain done to Lord Ullin?

Answer:

  1. Lord Ullin cried in grief to see his daughter.
  2. His daughter’s tragic death which Lord Ullin was watching before his own eyes, was the cause of his grief.
  3. The Scottish chieftain had eloped with Lord Ullin’s beautiful daughter.

Question: Twas vain: the loud waves lash’d the shore,
Return or aid preventing:
The water wild went o’er his child,
And he was left lamenting.

(Lines 53—56)

अनुवाद : यह सब बेकार था। ऊँची उठती और शोर करती लहरों ने तट को घेर लिया था। ये लहरें किसी भी प्रकार के बचाव और उन्हें वापस लाने के प्रयास में बाधक हो रही थीं। उफनता हुआ पानी उसकी बच्ची के ऊपर से चला गया। वह मर गयी और वह शोक मनाते खेड़ा रहा।

Paraphrase: Everything was useless. Loud waves had surrounded the shore. These waves were fatal to their life. Ullin’s daughter sank into the stormy water and died. He was left lamenting.

  1. What was ‘vain’ and how?
  2. Describe the waves of the sea.
  3. Who was left lamenting?

Answer:

  1. Lord Ullin’s late assurance of forgiving his daughter and her lover was of no use and hence, it was in vain.
  2. The stormy waves were beating against the shore.
  3. Lord Ullin was left lamenting the tragic death of his daughter.

Extract Based Questions (3 Marks each)

Question: “A Chieftain, to the highlands bound,
Cries, “Boatman, do not tarry!
And I’ll give thee a silver pound
To row us o’er the ferry!” –

  1. Who is the Chieftain here? Where is he going to?
  2. What does he otter to induce the boatman to row them across?
  3. Trace a word that means the chief of a clan.

Answer:

  1. The ‘Chieftain’ is the lover of Lord Ullin’s daughter. He is going to the highlands.
  2. He offers a silver pound to the boatman to row them across.
  3. Chief of a clan = chieftain. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “Now who be ye, would cross Lochgyle, This dark and stormy weather?
O, I’ am the chief of Ulva’s isle, And this, Lord Ullin’s daughter.”

  1. Why is the speaker of the first two lines here?
  2. who is the second person here?Who is the other person with him?
  3. Why is the speaker surprised when the other person asks him to help them across Lochgyle?

Answer:

  1. The speaker of the first two fines is the boatman.
  2. The second person here is die Chieftain, chief of Ulva’s isle.The other person with him is his beloved, Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  3. The speaker is the boatman who is surprised when the other person asks him to help them across Lochgyle because the weather is dark and stormy. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: ‘And fast before her father’s men.
Three days we’ve fled together,
For should he find us in the glen,
My blood would stain the heather’.

  1. For how long have they fled together and why?
  2. Who does ‘we’ in the second line refer to?
  3. From whom have ‘we’ fled and why?

Answer:

  1. Both have fled together for three days from fear of Lord Ullin.
  2. ‘We’ in the second line refers to the Chieftain of Ulva isle and his beloved Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  3. ‘We’ i.e., the Chieftain and his beloved have fled from Cord Ullin because he is opposed to their alliance. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “His horsemen hard behind us ride;
Should they our steps discover;
Then who will cheer my bonny bride.
When they have slain her lover?”

  1. Whose ‘horsemen’ are behind whom?
  2. What would happen if the speaker is caught?
  3. What is the chief anxiety of the speaker?

Answer:

  1. Lord Ullin’s horsemen are after the Chieftain of Ulva isle and his beloved, Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  2. If the speaker is caught, he will be slain instantly.
  3. The chief anxiety of the speaker is who will cheer up his lovely beloved after he is killed by Lord Ullin’s horsemen. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question 5: Out spoke the hardy Highland wight,
“I’ll go, my chief – I’m ready;
It is not for your silver bright,
But for your winsome lady:

  1. Who is ‘the hardy Highland wight’ ?
  2. What promise does he make?
  3. What character of this ‘Highland wight’ is revealed here?

Answer:

  1. ‘The hardy Highland wight’ is the boatman.
  2. He promises that he will ferry the Chieftain and his beloved, Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  3. These lines reveal that the ‘Highland wight’ is a man of integrity. He is not after money. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “And by my word !the bonny bird
In danger shall not tarry;
So, though the waves are raging white,
I’ll row you o’er the ferry.”

  1. Identify the speaker and the person spoken to.
  2. What is the occasion?
  3. What promise does the speaker make?

Answer:

  1. The hardy Highland wight, i.e., the boatman is the speaker.He is speaking to the Chieftain and his bonny beloved, Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  2. The Chieftain and his beloved want to cross the glen at the earliest as they are being chased by Lord Ullin ‘and his horsemen. The Chieftain is asking the wight to ferry them across hurriedly.
  3. The speaker, i.e., the boatman promises to row them over in the ferry. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “By this the storm grew loud apace.
The water-wraith was shrieking;
And in the scowl of heaven each face
Grew dark as they were speaking”.

  1. What had become of water as the storm grew fierce?
  2. What change occurred in the aspect of the sky?
  3. Why do you think the water-wraith was shrieking?

Answer:

  1. The water had assumed the shape of a ghost in that wild weather.
  2. The sky looked frowning in that rough and wild weather.The human faces had become dark,
  3. The water-wraith was shrieking to give a premonition of the tragedy that was going to befall the Chieftain and his beloved. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “But still as wilder blew the wind.
And as the night grew drearer,
A down the glen rode armed men,
Their trampling sounded nearer”.

  1. Why did the glen assume a fearful form?
  2. What kind of weather it was?
  3. Who were ‘the armed men’?

Answer:

  1. The glen assumed a fearful form as the wind grew wilder and the night became drearer.
  2. It was rough and wild weather.
  3. The armed men were the horsemen of Lord Ullin. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “O haste thee, haste!” the lady cries,
Though tempests round us gather;
I’ll meet the raging of the skies,
But not an angry father.”

  1. Who is the lady here?
  2. Why does she cry?
  3. Why was her father angry?

Answer:

  1. The lady is Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  2. She cries lest her father and his men should kill her lover.
  3. Her father was angry because she had fled with her lover, the Chieftain of Ulva, against his wishes. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “The boat has left a stormy land,
A stormy sea before her,
When, O! too strong, for human hand,
The tempest gather’d o’er her”.

  1. Where is the boat now? Whom is it carrying?
  2. What do ‘stormy land’ and ‘stormy sea’ indicate?
  3. Explain: ‘too strong for human hand’.

Answer:

  1. The boat is now in the stormy sea. If is carrying Lord Ullin’s daughter, her lover and the boatman.
  2. A ‘stormy land’ indicates ‘storm’ in the household of Lord Ullin and ‘stormy sea’ indicates roughness of the sea.
  3. The tempest had become so furious that it was difficult to be tackled easily. It has become too rough ‘and wild. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “And still they row’d amidst the roar
Of waters fast prevailing;
Lord Ullin reach’d that fatal shore
His wrath was changed to wailing.”

  1. How do you know that it was difficult to row?
  2. Why is the shore called ‘fatal’?
  3. Why did Lord Ullin’s anger change to wailing?

Answer:

  1. They had to row in the middle of the roar of water which had enveloped them all over Obviously, it was difficult to row.
  2. The shore is called ‘fatal’ because it is going to claim the life of the Chieftain and his beloved, Lord Ullin’s daughter.
  3. Lord Ullin’s anger changed to wailing because the tempest was going to swallow his beautiful and charming daughter. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “For, sore dismay’d through storm and shade,
His child he did discover,
One lovely hand she stretch’d for aid,
And one was round her lover.”

  1. Who is ‘he’ and who is ‘his child’?
  2. What did she do to seek help?
  3. Comment on the situation at this point in the story.

Answer:

  1. He’ is Lord Ullin and ‘his child’ lovely daughter who is struggling with the stormy waves.
  2. She extended her hand towards her father to seek his help.
  3. The situation was most pathetic. The storm had overwhelmed her She had extended one hand towards her father for help and her other hand Was a around her lover. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “Come back! Come back!” he cried in grief
‘Across this stormy water.
And I’ll forgive your highland chief.
My daughter! – O my daughter!”

  1. Who is ‘he’?
  2. Why, did ‘he’ urge her to come back?
  3. Could the change in ‘his’ heart save his daughter?

Answer:

  1. ‘He’ is Lord Ullin.
  2. ‘He’ urged her to come back because she was sure to be swallowed by the sea in that stormy weather.
  3. No, the change in ‘his’ heart could not save his daughter. She and her lover, the Chieftain of Ulva isle, were drowned in the sea. (1 × 3 = 3)

Question: “I was vain’ the loud waves lash’d the shore,
Return or aid preventing;
The water wild went o’er his child,
And he was left lamenting.”

  1. What was ‘vain’?
  2. Why was he ‘left lamenting’?
  3. What happened to the lovers?

Answer:

  1. Lord Ullin’s assurance to forgive his daughter and her lover was ‘vain’ because the storm had claimed their lives.
  2. Lord Ullin was ‘left lamenting’ because he saw his daughter drowning, along with her lover
  3. Both the lovers were drowned by the stormy sea. (1 × 3 = 3)

Short Answer Type Questions (30 – 40 Words) (2 Marks each)

Question: Why does Lord Ullin’s daughter defy her father and elope with her lover? (Board Term I 2012)

Answer: Lord Ullin’s daughter defies her father and elopes with her lover as she values love for her lover more than her father. She elopes knowing well that she won’t be allowed to marry the chieftain. So, she defies her father due to love.

Question: What did Lord Ullin see on reaching the shore? How did he react to the situation? (Board Term I 2012)

Answer: When Lord Ullin reached the shore, he saw to his horror that his daughter and the Chieftain were completely surrounded by dangerous sea storm.It was going to drown them. He reacted in asking his daughter to return as he would forgive her and her lover. He also started weeping.

Question: Why does Lord Ullin’s wrath change into wailing? (Board Term I 2012)

Answer: Lord Ullin’s wrath changed into wailing as he saw his daughter was going to be drowned by the dangerous sea storm. He then was not Lord Ullin but a father. He therefore, asked her to return.

Question: Who is the Chieftain and what does he say to the boatman?

Answer: The chieftain is the chief of a clan in Ulva’s isle. He is bound for the Highlands. He asks the boatman to row him and his beloved across the Lochigyle as his beloved is Lord Ullin’s daughter arid Lord Ullin’s men are after them to kill.

Question: What does the Chieftain say to the boatman about Lord Ullin?

Answer: The Chieftain says to the boatman that Lord Ullin, his beloved’s father, is after his life and that of his beloved. They have fled together for three days. If he finds them in the valley, he will kill him. So, they must cross Lochgyle at once.

Question: How did the boatman react after hearing the Chieftain?

Answer: The Highland boatman heard the Chieftain. Then he told him that he would take them across without any delay. He offered to do so not for any money but for his attractive lady. He did so even though the waves were getting very high.

Question: How did the weather become so dangerous?

Answer: Very soon the storm grew very loud. The sea water rose high menacingly. It assumed a ghost-like form and shrieked. All the faces of those who spoke grew dark in the dirty look of the sky. Everything looked dangerous.

Question: What amazing thing happened then?

Answer: The boatman promised the Chieftain to ferry them without any delay. But the storm became dangerous- Then …, the stamping feet of Lord Ullin’s horsemen could be heard coming nearer and nearer them.

Question: How did Lord Ullin react seeing his daughter in the grip of death?

Answer: Lord Ullin saw that his beloved daughter was drowning. He cried to her in grief to come back across the stormy water. He told her that he would forgive her and her lover, the Chieftain.

Question: Describe how the Chieftain and his beloved died.

Answer: Very soon the loud waves of the stormy sea pounded the seashore.No aid was possible. The wild stormy water went over Lord Ullin’s daughter and the Chieftain. They drowned instantly.

Long Answer Type Questions (80-100 Words) (4 Marks each)

Question: How do the two lovers meet their end in ‘Lord Ullin’s Daughter’? Give the account in 150 words. (Board Term I 2012)

Answer: The manner in which the two lovers meet their end in this poem is really very sad and tragic. They, decided to elope because Lord Ullin was against them. He sent his men to catch and kill them.The boatman rowed them over the ferry. But the waves were strong and fierce due to the tempest,The water was rising high to the skies. Lord Ullin had reached the shore. He was crying as the seastorm was going to drown them. He called his daughter back because his fatherly instinct lay heavy on him. He wanted his daughter to come back. But the sea waves soon overpowered them and drowned them. Lord Ullin kept weeping as there was nothing he could do to save them. The scene was really heart-moving.

Question: Imagine you are Lord Ullin. Your rigidity and narrow-mindedness cost you your daughter’s life. You curse yourself for having opposed her alliance with the Chieftain. Narrate your experience as a fattier lamenting the loss of your child in the form of a diary entry. (Board Term I 2012)

Answer:

Wednesday, 20th August, 20xx
Dear Diary,
I lament the day when my beloved daughter drowned with her lover the Chieftain of Ulva. I curse my rigidity and narrow-mindedness which cost me my daughter’s life. Love is natural and now I realize she did no wrong in falling in love with the Chieftain. But she should have thought about our tribe’s honour. She should not have eloped with the Chieftain. She should have taken us all in confidence and we would found out some way before the tragic end of my daughter. I curse myself that I opposed her alliance with the Chieftain out of anger and hard-heartedness. My heart comes out and this is not the grief of the chief of our tribe but that of a father. All fathers know how dear their children are to, them but it is all over now. I regret having put my soldiers behind her and the Chieftain. Instead, I should have valued the changing times and the changing values of our tribe. But now nothing can be done. We must think over such issues with an open heart and not deal with them with rigidity.

Lord Ullin.

Question: Answer the following in about 150 words. Imagine you are one of the chiefs of Lord Ullin’s cavalry. Narrate your experience, as you witnessed a father lamenting the loss of his child, in your diary. (Board Term I 2012)

Answer:

20th April, 20xx

Dear Diary,

I witnessed a terrible sight today. Actually, we had been given orders by Lord Ullin to catch hold of chief of Ulva who had eloped with his daughter.We followed both of them. At last we reached the seashore after three days. We faced lots of problems on the way. To our horror we found that there was a wild seastorm.The water was reaching the skies. Very soon it was a different scene as the chieftain, Lord Ullin’s daughter and the boatman were drowned. Then I saw Lord Ullin wailing bitterly over the drowning of his beloved daughter.He Was raising his hands upwards towards the sty He was crying most piteously. Now Lord Ullin was not Lord Ullin but a helpless father seeing his own daughter drowning.The storm was violent and unabated. The scene was Very fearful. Seeing Lord Ullin lamenting over there, was the most piteous sight.I felt choked within as I could no longer see him wailing so piteously.

Question: You are Jenny, one of the best friends of Lord Ullin’s daughter. Her death at sea has shocked and disturbed you.You sympathize with the lovers and are Very sad.Express your feelings to another friend of yours who recently came to know about this tragic incident (Board Term I 2012)

Answer:

18th November, 20xx
My dear Pearl,

I hope you are well, perhaps you know that Lord Ullin’s daughter drowned with her lover, the Chieftain while crossing the Lochgyle in the ferry.It was really tragic that they drowned with the boatman in the terrible sea storm. Actually, Lord Ullin had sent his men after them with the orders for killing the lovers when they found them.Lord Ullin himself had been chasing them in his great anger. I feel great sympathy for the daughter. She had fallen in love with the Chieftain and I find it no crime. I am on the side of the lovers as love is divine and natural. This is really tragic that they had to die such a tragic death. They had not seen life as such. How cruel it was that they had to die in their youth? I am feeling greatly shocked and you may also be feeling the same. But we can do nothing about luck or destiny. However, this tragic incident can’t be forgotten.

Yours sincerely,
Jenny

Question: The chief of another tribe friendly to Lord Ulli’s, writes a letter to Lord Ullin about how his daughter died; Lord Ullin replies to this letter. Write this letter on his behalf. (V. Imp.)

Answer:

Lord Ullin’s clan/tribe Scottish Moor Scotland
20th August, 20xx

My dear Lord Blen,

Thank you for your letter sympathizing with me over the irreparable loss of my only daughter. I feel that I am responsible for her death at a personal level. But I couldn’t ignore my tribal or social responsibilities. I couldn’t allow her to marry the Chieftain of Ulva and so I issued orders to catch them. But the tragedy occurred.

As the head of the clan, I followed the couple when they eloped. My men had orders to kill them wherever they were found. Me and my men found my daughter and her lover crossing the deadly Lochgyle seashore,They had not gone too far and could be saved if they had returned.The sea had already assumed demoniac shapes.The storm had become intense and deadly with water waves assuming ghost-like shapes.The sky was scowling. Seeing their death as imminent, my fatherly heart melted and I called out to them to return. I told them that I would forgive them if they returned safe and sound. But the couple didn’t heed my saying so and instead went ahead into the deadly sea. I saw them being enveloped in the stormy waves and soon they were drowned. I can’t forget the scene which claimed my daughter’s life. I shall regret it ever.

Yours sincerely,
Lord Ullin

Question: Who are the lovers? Why are they trying to escape and what happens to them in the end?

Answer: The lovers are the Chief of Ulva’s Island and Lord Ullin’s lovely daughter. Their tribes are enemies to each other. So Lord Ullin has been pursuing the Chief of Ulva, his daughter’s lover. They are trying to escape from Lord Ullin’s men. They have orders to catch them and kill them. That’s why, the Chief of Ulva and his beloved ask the boatman for a favour.It is to ferry them across the stormy water without any more delay.The weather is really dark and stormy and looks menacing, but they also fear for their lives.While crossing the sea in the ferry, they drown in that bad weather

Question: What is a ballad? How is ‘Lord Ullin’s Daughter’ a ballad?

Answer: A ballad is a long narrative poem. It tells a story having romance, suspense etc. It is musical also. It can be sung with a musical instrument. It often deals with heroic deeds. ‘Lord Ullin’s Daughter’ has all these qualities. It has romance, suspense, heroic deeds etc. The lyrical quality is due to its ab ab rhyme scheme. Then there is repetition of sounds. It is ‘b’ in bonny bride, ‘r’ in ‘dark and stormy weather’, etc. This makes it musical. This poem is, thus, a tale of love and adventure, as all ballads are, so it is a ballad.

Question: What message does ‘Lord Ullin’s Daughter’ convey to the readers? (Value Based Question)

Answer: The poem ‘Lord Ullin’s Daughter’ is a tragic story of two lovers who lost their lives for the sake of their love. It was due to the false ego and stubbornness of Lord Ullin which culminated in the drowning of the couple in the sea. This poem conveys the message that thoughtless and rash decisions can lead to disastrous results.

Sometimes, ego of the parents leads to catastrophic results. Dictatorial parents do not try to understand the feelings of their young children. It gives rise to a conflict resulting from the clash of the rebellious nature of youth and the authority of parents. Vision and foresight can help prevent family breakups.

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