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Figure of Speech

Abstract Nouns Examples For Students And Children

A noun can be defined as something that describes a name, place or thing. There are several types of nouns such as common, proper, compound, predicate and so on. Of all these, an abstract noun is one that cannot be perceived by our five senses, i.e., touch, smell, sound, sight or taste. Although it is difficult to recognize an abstract noun, owing to the fact that a certain word can have various functions, it can be identified based on our perceptions. For example, the word ‘love‘ is an abstract noun as it does not have a physical existence; it can only be felt as an emotion and can be expressed via certain actions. Typically, abstract noun is a term given to emotions, ideas, feelings, traits, qualities, experiences and even to an aspect or a state of being. The concept of abstract nouns relies on the fact that the objects are not physical and do not take up any space or matter; however, they are not immaterial. Concrete nouns, on the other hand, are the opposite of abstract nouns; the former can be distinguished by all our five senses. A puppy, for instance, can be seen, heard, touched, smelt and even tasted (if you wish!).

If you are interested in learning more about abstract nouns and some of its example, look below.

Examples

Ideas / Concepts / Events Traits / Attributes Emotions / Feelings
Dreams Loyalty Love
Knowledge Pride Hatred
Sale Reliability Loneliness
Behaviour Wisdom Shock
Justice Fairness Enthusiasm
Liberty Elegance Thrill
Nature Energy Anger
Omen Stupidity Peace
Laughter Strictness Happiness
Crime Width Pride
Faith Speed Sympathy
Speculation Courage Ego
Enhancement Honesty Adoration
Power Success Mercy
Beliefs Integrity Worry
Manhood Ability Hope
Thoughts Bravery Hunger
Opportunity Perseverance Joy
Luxury Freshness Sensitivity
Opinion Compassion Infatuation
Performance Uniqueness Deceit
Peculiarity Strength Jealousy
Failure Charity Curiosity
Culture Self-Control Sophistication
Law Misery Thirst
Brotherhood Maturity Wariness
Dedication Wit Hurt
Information Redemption Ire
Trust Pain Annoyance
Friendship Brilliance Wrath
Education Warmth Pleasure
Relaxation Skill Envy
Progress Deceit Revenge
Trouble Beauty
Hospitality Graciousness
Relationships Confidence
Communication Leadership
Sleep Weakness
Principle
Marriage
Religion

Suffixes Used For Abstract Nouns

  • -tion
  • -ism
  • -age
  • -ness
  • -ment
  • -ity
  • -ance/-ence
  • -ability
  • -acy
  • -ship

Abstract Nouns vs. Concrete Nouns

  • It is important to understand the actual difference between the two forms of nouns, as they can be commonly confused. Consider this statement: Politicians were fighting for ‘the chair’. What kind of noun do you think ‘chair’ falls under? Yes, abstract since ‘the chair’ here, does not refer to the furniture. Instead, it is the power associated with the position that cannot tap our five senses.
  • Child is a concrete noun whereas childhood is an abstract noun. It is understood that a child is a physical being while childhood is an intangible state that cannot be tasted or touched.
  • Even in writing, there comes a danger of abstraction being misunderstood due to the various meanings it conveys to different people. For instance, the words ‘good taste’ can mean anything ranging from actually a nice tasting thing to being interesting, and from modern to simple. Therefore, the usage of concrete nouns to support any references to abstract nouns is suggested. Lesser vague entities and clearer, more concise nouns are preferred in a sentence. Concrete nouns are used as metaphors so as to help the reader envision the idea that is being conveyed. Example: Happiness is like a soft bunny. Here, happiness (abstract) is being compared to a soft bunny (concrete) so as to give the former noun more significance.

From the above article, it can be deciphered that abstract nouns are normally non-countable (mass), although some can be counted. They may exist in both singular and possessive forms and follow the rules of English grammar.

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